Integrating Urban Farms into the Social Landscape of Cities

Community buy-in for urban farms_July2014_Full report.pdf

In cities across the U.S., urban farming is gaining traction as a way of productively using degraded vacant land while increasing access to fresh produce within cities. As urban farming  continues to be promoted by municipal governments and others, it is important to understand how to ensure these projects are viable. One consideration for urban farms located in populated areas of a city is the reaction of residents who live in neighborhoods surrounding farms. Urban farms differ from urban gardens in their emphasis on income-generating agricultural activity. As such, they can challenge traditional images residents might have for how land is used in city neighborhoods. Urban farming projects are most likely to survive and thrive if they have local support, but how can these projects gain community buy-in? Through interviews with urban farmers, neighborhood leaders, community residents, and other key stakeholders in Baltimore City, we sought to understand the processes that are most effective for gaining the acceptance of city residents for urban farming.

How to Build an Aquaponics System with IBC Totes

TotePonicsVer4.pdf

The most simple definition of Aquaponics is the combination of aquaculture (raising fish) and hydroponics (the soil-less growing of plants) that grows fish and plants together in one integrated system. … Solid fish waste is turned into vermicompost that also acts as food for the plants.

The Toteponics Kit uses three IBCs (Intermediate Bulk Carriers, also called Tote Tanks in some parts of the USA, hence the name of the kit) to construct a productive, back-yard aquaponics system, made up of one fish tank and three media grow-beds. GroTowers can also be added, if desired.

This is a fast, easy and cheap way to get started in aquaponics. IBC tanks of around 1000 litres capacity will give your system the stability and reliability to grow copious amounts of fish and vegetables.

 

Building Healthy Places Toolkit

The Building Healthy Places Toolkit outlines opportunities to enhance health through changes in approaches to buildings and projects. Developers, owners, property managers, designers, investors, and others involved in real estate decision making can use these strategies and tactics to create places that contribute to healthier people and communities and to enhance and preserve value.

The Toolkit provides 21 evidence-based recommendations that are supported by action-oriented evidence-based and best practice strategies. The report also includes seven schematics that illustrate how the recommendations can be applied across real estate product sectors

Harvesting Opportunity: The Power of Regional Food System Investments to Transform Communities

Harvesting Opportunity: The Power of Regional Food System Investments to Transform Communities

 

Harvesting Opportunity: The Power of Regional Food System Investments to Transform Communities, published as a partnership between the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s agencies of Rural Development and the Agricultural Marketing Service focuses on regional food systems as a means for enhancing economic opportunity.

In recent years, consumers have become increasingly interested in where their food comes from and how their food dollars can provide greater support for local food-related businesses and farmers. Over this same time period, policymakers and practitioners have gained new insights into the potential for regional food systems to promote economic growth for both rural and urban communities through the creation of new or the enhancement of existing jobs and businesses. Regional food system stakeholders have also learned that appropriately targeted policies and support can advance the economic and financial security of low- and moderate-income households and communities.

Harvesting Opportunity explores these recent findings, highlights models for collaboration between policymakers, practitioners and the financial community, and discusses research, policy and resource gaps that, if addressed, might contribute to the success of regional food systems strategies. The publication includes a foreword by Lael Brainard, Governor, Federal Reserve Board of Governors, and James Bullard, President and Chief Executive Officer, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.